Tagalog Translation

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The Tagalog Language:


Language Overview: Tagalog is a language of the Philippines. Tagalog has a classification of Austronesian, Malayo-Polynesian, Meso Philippine, Central Philippine, and Tagalog.

Regions Spoken: Tagalog is also spoken in Canada, Guam, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, and USA.

Population: About 14,000,000 people speak Tagalog in the Philippines, as of 1995. The total population of all Tagalog speakers is about 15,900,000 (which means that about 1,413,000 people speak Tagalog outside of the Philippines).

Dialects: Some dialects for Tagalog are Lubang, Manila, Marinduque, Bataan, Batangas, Bulacan, Tanay-Paete, and Tayabas.

Brief History: Tagalog is taught in primary and secondary schools in the Philippines. It was used in the bible in 1905. And Tagalog was used as the basis for the development of the Filipino language. Most people who speak Tagalog are of the Christian faith/religion.

 

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Tagalog Facts...

Tagalog is an Austronesian language with about 56 million speakers in the Philippines, particularly in Manila, central and southern parts of Luzon, and also on the islands of Lubang, Marinduque, and the northern and eastern parts of Mindoro.

Tagalog speakers can also be found in many other countries, including Canada, Guam, Midway Islands, Saudi Arabia, the UAE, UK and USA.

Tagalog used to be written with the Baybayin alphabet, which probably developed from the Kawi script of Java, Bali and Sumatra, which in turn descended from the Pallava script, one of the southern Indian scripts derived from Brahmi.

Today the Baybayin alphabet is used mainly for decorative purposes and the Latin alphabet is used to write to Tagalog.